Maya Spiritual Bathing Ritual

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Maya Spiritual Healing Rituals can be used to help move through the inevitable emotional hardships that all of us experience. A wonderful way to wash away unresolve stress that may be threatening to manifest itself as body-mind dis-ease. 

Spritual bathing with flowers + Herbs to cleanse and heal

Spritual bathing with flowers + Herbs to cleanse and heal

Maya Spiritual Bathing Ritual

Spiritual Bathing is a centuries old Maya healing practice that balances the flow of ch’ulel or life force between body and soul. Spiritual healing can be used to help move through the inevitable emotional hardships that all of us experience, and is especially useful with unresolved stress that may be threatening to manifest itself in physical illness.

Diseases such as high blood pressure, arthritis, heart disease, and even cancer have been linked to unresolved emotional stress resulting in physical symptoms and illness. The Maya recognize diseases of the Spirit, not separate from the Body.  The ancient wisdom and awareness of the connection between the spiritual and physical causes of illness is the founding principle behind Spiritual Bathing Ritual.

The intention of this bodywork practice is to address the physical, emotional and spiritual bodies of the individual with compassion and non-judgment to help them return to vitality, peace and well-being from within.

Abigail McClam offers spiritual baths in the tradition of Maya healing to infants, by teaching their parents a home bath practice, to children, teens, and adults of all life stages. The practice may include brushing the body with fresh basil or rosemary, burning copal incense, and being splashed with a combination of water and healing herbs and flowers. There are different versions of this for indoor and outdoor baths. Participants are asked to bring their bathing suit. The service is provided is the privacy of the Lotus Treatment Room and Spa Shower.

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Spiritual Bathing for Stress + Trauma Release

“The indigenous peoples throughout South America and Mesoamerica have long understood both the nature of fear and the essence of trauma. What’s more, they seemed to know how to transform it through their shamanic healing rituals. After colonization by the Spanish and Portuguese, the indigenous peoples borrowed their word susto to describe what happens in trauma. Susto translates graphically as “fright paralysis” and as “soul loss” Anyone who has suffered a trauma knows, first, paralyzing fright, followed by the bereft feeling of losing your way in the world, of being severed from your very soul.”

In An Unspoken Voice: How the Body Releases Trauma and Restores Goodness Peter A Levine, PhD